b-2 bomber's posts - Indonesian uPOST

How Do Stealth Airplanes Work?

How does radar not detect a B-2 stealth bomber? How can an aircraft with a 172-foot wingspan register as small as just a large bird, if anything at all? The Northrop B-2 Spirit escapes radar by being specifically designed to reflect radio waves away from the source so it’d never be detected.

Watch a B-2 bomber refuel and then make its fuel receptacle disappear

Damn, that thing really is stealth. This video shows how the B-2 stealth bomber refuels and rotates its fuel receptacle so that it can maintain its stealth. You see the receptacle in clear view when it's ready for fuel but after it's all filled up, it's gone and the whole plane is back to being undetected.

10 Machines So Huge They'll Destroy Your Sense of Scale 10 Machines So Huge They'll Destroy Your Sense of Scale

With consumer technology companies locked in an endless race to to make the smallest, sleekest gadgets they can, it's easy to forget the primal joy of seeing mindblowingly huge hardware.

Massive Machines Gallery Massive Machines Gallery

The Overburden Conveyor Bridge F60, used in open mines. It looks pretty huge here, sure, but how big is it?

Stealth Bomber: Cool As a Plane, Really, Really, Really Stupid as a Motorcycle Stealth Bomber: Cool As a Plane, Really, Really, Really Stupid as a Motorcycle

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the B-2 Spirit stealth bomber, an occasion that can only be properly immortalized by the crew at Orange County Choppers, apparently.

New B-2 Bomber Crash Photos Show Carnage Up Close New B-2 Bomber Crash Photos Show Carnage Up Close

Joe Pappalardo got some crisp, high quality military close-ups of the Spirit of Kansas, the $1.2 billion stealth B-2 bomber that crashed in Guam last February. We published other images of the crash scene before (because we like to see a billion dollars burning), but all the mess was cleaned up then. Here you can see…

The Massive, Expensive Problem of Obsolete Tech The Massive, Expensive Problem of Obsolete Tech

In 2005, a control room for the A and C subway lines in NYC caught fire. "No larger than a kitchen," the room held 600 relays, switches and circuits that keep track of trains and keep everything running. Officials originally thought it would take three to five years to get the lines back to normal capacity.…

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